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Archive for the ‘Shopping’ Category

Most Batu Pahat folks would be familiar with the name ‘Butterfly Kacang’, loosely abbreviated from the Butterfly Brand Roasted Nuts Factory.

This factory is located along Jalan Mustaffa, the small road linking Batu Pahat town with The Summit Shopping Complex. Public buses that ply the route to Summit almost always pass thru here. If you are thinking of seeing a grand entrance like those factories you see around Batu Pahat Industrial Estates, then you are in for a surprise.

It’s only 2 connecting shoplots, one being the place where they packaged the nuts and the other being the retail outlets.

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Very simply entrance right. But looks can be deceiving, let’s go in and have a better look at what they sell.

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Rows and rows of assorted nuts, including those sweet and sour preserved fruits. Most of these are manufactured in the factory, you can never miss the big Butterfly logo in front of their packages. Let’s have a closer look on the wares. First we have the nuts varieties.

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The picture below shows most of the nuts that’s manufactured from the factory. We call these their main products. You can see them everywhere in Malaysia, they are usually packaged in smaller packets for easy consumption. Open one packet, pour everything in one’s mouth and start munching.

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So you people might ask, so this factory only supplies nuts to Malaysia only, what about other countries. They do export them to other countries as well, but for those in the South East Asia Region there are dealers doing that. As for countries such as Africa, they are exported in the packages as seen below. These packages are to be loaded to lorries and then transported to port to be exported.

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You can see these corn (jagung) everytime you go to a pasar malam. They are usually boiled then taken out to simmer. Sold for about RM2.00 for 5 pieces. These are ‘jagung biasa’ not sweet corn like what you see sold in hypermarkets, those are more expensive.

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There are many varieties of keropok (crackers) sold here. The most common one is the keropok lekor. A popular and the most visible fried snack in Terengganu, the keropok lekur (lekor) is made of fish meat, ground to a paste, and mixed with sago. Keropok is best eaten hot with its special chili dip.

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Coming in two main different forms, the long chewy ones are called ‘lekor’, while the thin, crispy ones are called ‘keping’. (Left – keping, right – lekor).

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You can find other stuff sold in a pasar malam, like for example:

Soya drink and soya paste (tau foo fah)

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Tauhu Bakar

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Quail Eggs, these are sold at RM3.00 for 45 eggs.

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Next we have the fruits section, cheaper alternative to buy fruits here.

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Last but not least, I leave here the last pic of a stall owner posing with his delicious roasted quail.

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Pasar malam is a Malay word that literally means night market, “Pasar” being related to “bazaar” in Persian. A pasar malam is a market in Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia that opens in the evening, usually in housing areas. It brings together a collection of stalls that usually sell goods such as fruit, vegetables, snacks, toys, clothes, movie discs and ornaments at cheap, reasonable prices. Pasar malams often open only one to a few days of the week, as the traders rotate around different housing areas on different days of the week. Haggling over prices is a common practice at such markets.

Pasar malam and night markets are not to be confused. Pasar malams mostly open on Saturdays (or other days, depends on the location) from 6pm to 11pm, around the housing areas, whereas night markets open every night. Most of the time, Pasar malams open directly at the roadside and would hinder traffic of the entire street from 6pm to 11pm. After 11pm the street is cleared and be reverted back to normal although pasar malams are usually held over a duration of a day to a week. Pasar malams are usually attended by families as a short outing.
The picture below is a typical scene of a pasar malam in my hometown, Batu Pahat. This happens every Thursday evening in Jalan Omar (also known as Old Bus Stand).

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One nice feature about pasar malam is that it isn’t cluttered like certain night markets. They are split into different sections. There are sections for food, clothes, shoes, fresh produce, vegetables, fruits and etc. Below is an example of the clothes section.

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There are a few food sold in this pasar malam. I will briefly go introduce them here in case anyone drops by and visit it, can go to the respective stalls.

Roti John, essentially an omelette sandwich, is a popular Malay breakfast and snack item in Singapore and Malaysia. The ingredients include minced mutton, onion, egg, tomato-chilli sauce and a baguette loaf. The mutton mince, egg and chopped onions are fried on a skillet and then placed into the cavity of a baguette halved lengthwise. The whole is then briefly pan-fried on the skillet and then served after being cut into several portions. A variant is to place the minced mutton, onions and sauce inside the baguette, then baguette dipped into beaten egg, and the whole then panfried on the skillet. You can find this lady next to a chicken rice stall. Prices are RM1.20 for either beef, chicken or sardine.

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You can also try out the laksa penang (Penang Laksa) stall right beside the roti john lady. It only cost RM1.00 per packet.

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‘Ayam Percik’ is a popular local delicacy, especially in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. It is usually prepared by grilling chicken, parts or whole, over fire with intermittent sprinkling of the percik sauce on the chicken such that when the chicken gets cooked a pasty layer of sauce with distinct smoke flavour cover both sides of the chicken. Presently, this dish is only available at food stalls and restaurants around the country.

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The Ramly Burger, also known as the Burger Ramly, is a Malaysian burger created by Ramly Moknin popular in Malaysia and Singapore. Though the term “Ramly Burger” may refer to any of the hamburgers sold in a Ramly Burger stall, it most commonly refers to the Ramly Burger Special. While the amount and type of ingredients vary greatly depending on location, a typical Ramly Burger consists of a beef or chicken patty, margarine, onions, an egg, cabbage, mayonnaise, and Worcestershire sauce. This list is subjective, however, as Ramly Burgers are famous for being highly customizable.

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